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My first TIFF

IMG_1344.JPG For a few years now I’ve been wanting to go to the Toronto International Film Festival but could never quite manage to fit it in. This year, TIFF’s 40th, happily coincided with a trip to Toronto for another reason – and now I understand that TIFF is the event you should clear your schedule for.

I had spent some time going through the program and choosing the films I really wanted to see. I bypassed films with major Hollywood stars and glitzy primeres, figuring I’d never get in. But the first day tickets went on sale to the public, all the films on my list were off-sale, which is TIFF for sold out. Realizing that you can’t really go wrong with the incredible programming, I was happy to get a ticket to a late night screening of a French-language film.

Robin, the incredibly helpful desk clerk at my hostel, recommended heading out to early to enjoy the festival atmosphere, so I set off into the rain to grab a streetcar down Spadina Avenue to King Street.

I quickly realized that one of the special things about TIFF is the sheer number of films being screened in Toronto’s Entertainment Disctrict, an area of a few blocks that is filed with classic stage theatres and TIFF’s beautiful Lightbox theatres. With the streets closed to traffic, and the lines of film goers waiting to get into nearly a dozen venues, there’s an incredible energy and excitement in the air. Walking down the street to the main box office, I passed red carpets, official media cameras, and a sizable crowd of people huddled under umbrellas in for the chance to see Matt Damon and Jessica Chastain leave the gala for “The Martian.”

Back at the Lightbox, I picked up my ticket. The lady next to me wanted to do an exchange and wondered about Les Cowboys. “I’m going to see that!” I jumped in.

“What’s it about?”
“It’s in French.”
“I’ll take it.”

We were directed to stand in a line. This wait was actually one of the unexpected pleasures of TIFF, with people passing the time chatting about films on their list of have or to be seen.

I was behind two older gentlemen who had already been to four films since the festival had opened the previous day, including the Hebrew feature directed by Natalie Portman, a Spanish caper, and a Kiwi documentary about preserving early 20th century films in Afghanistan. They were full of tips on how to buy tickets to your favourite films (check at 7 a.m. the day of, and last but not least, RUSH!)

Finally it was time for our film. The stadium seats of the Lightbox ensure an unobstructed view for everyone. The film was introduced by the director of programming for the festival, and by the director himself. Having already won several Cesars (the Oscars of France), and known internationally for films such as Rust and Bone, Saint Laurent, and La Famille Belier, Thomas Bidegain told us he was very excited to present his film to a real audience (as opposed to the journals of Cannes).

The first line of the film is “Where’s Kelly?” (Ou est Kelly?) and we see how Kelly’s decision to live a new life has profound effects on her parents and brother. It had the audience gasping, crying, shocked, and laughing. In other words, all the feelings. The Q&A after the film highlighted the director’s goals, and I’m confident that he accomplished them through his storytelling.

As I headed back out into the rainy night, I saw Mr. Bidegain just ahead of me, and without a second thought, ran ahead and fangirled him. No doubt he was in a great mood after the screening and cheerfully agreed to a photo, wrapping me in a giant hug. It was an unbelievable moment. That’s the magic of TIFF.

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One response »

  1. Oh Yill it is marvellous!!! You are the Sandora of northern climes. I am inspired by your fabulous adventurousness. You and I share a zest for harvesting travel’s nectar whilst peeling away its acrid pith and dry pulp. Love! One

    Date: Fri, 18 Sep 2015 22:01:08 +0000 To: davidscript@live.com

    Reply

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